Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Staff Woodworking Competition - The Light Of My Life By Kristine Inkster

The Light Of My Life
Created by Kristine Inkster, Arbortech Executive Director


Novice woodworker? No 

Description of your wood art?
The base of a lamp for the home. 

Where did you get your inspiration for your wood art piece?
The piece of wood. I carved this piece because I was running out of time before the event was to be judged and saw this piece of cypress pine which I thought would make a good lamp base.

What type of wood did you use?
Camphor laurel.

What Arbortech tool/s did you use to create this piece?
  • TURBOPlane
  • 4" sanders
  • Mini Sander
  • Mini Industrial
What was your process in the creation of this project?
I cut it in half to make two pieces the same size and then drew a rough shape for the neck before cutting each piece with a bandsaw. After deciding which sides I wanted to show as the external edge of the lamp, I then ran a channel for the wiring down the center of each piece using the Arbortech Mini-Grinder with the Industrial Blade attached.
Once I had the channel I could glue both pieces together so  I could start shaping.  I then used the TURBOPlane to take off the edges and give me that nice rounded rectangular shape. 

When I was satisfied with the shape I  used the Contour Sander to sand the neck and sides.  I then used oil to finish off as I wanted a matte finish before threading the wiring through and gluing in a small piece of aluminum tubing into the top to make it look a little nicer.  Then I purchased a lamp shade which suited the base and have placed it on the entry hall table.

Where does this piece reside now?
Entry hall table in my house. See picture below of the lamp being displayed at my house. 


Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Staff Woodworking Competition - Yesterday's Hero By Steve Marsh


Yesterday's Hero
WINNER 2014 Arbortech woodworking competition
Created by Steve Marsh, Arbortech Financial Controller 


                                                                  
Novice woodworker? No 

Description of your wood art?
Scrap wood rescued from a tree which was being cut down. It was left outside to season and rot before being rescued and preserved. Showing contrast between extremes of condition within the torso. 

Where did you get your inspiration for your wood art piece?
The wood before rotting looked like a "complete" male torso. The wood itself was the inspiration.
I salvaged the wood when a neighbour cut down a very large Marri tree, originally the wood had an extra small branch which made it look much more like a male torso than it does now. The "natural" shape was displayed in my outdoor area for many years and provided habitat for many creepy crawlies and bugs. I noticed that the wood had started to rot, and I was keen to not lose the piece altogether. This coincided with me looking for a project to complete for the woodworking competition. Voila!  I decided to try and make a sculpture from the wood. I have many more pieces of wood in my yard from the same tree and hope to be making more items using this wood.

What type of wood did you use?
Marri. 

What Arbortech tool/s did you use to create this piece?
  • Mini-Grinder
  • Mini Sander
  • Contour Sander
What was your process in the creation of this project?
Firstly I started to remove any rotten wood, this was much more extensive than I had originally thought and ended up with the almost the entire core of the branch being removed, I then decided to finish the job and hollowed it out entirely. I wanted to highlight the affects and patterns in the wood caused by its long term exposure to the elements. Even quite late in the process there small inhabitants were fleeing their homes! and yes I did feel bad!
The process was quite organic and the style of the piece changed quite significantly while working on the wood. I ended up doing far less work on some parts that I had originally intended (mainly the legs) and other parts ended up being worked much more in order to show up the contrasts in the wood. This was a much different process to the other pieces I have made, where I had a very clear idea of what I wanted to achieve before even starting the work. 
Once the piece was finished I decided that it should be mounted in such a way as to highlight the contrasts between the various surfaces, so I used a piece of salvaged building timber and iron rod to mount the torso. The process was very rewarding in itself with many creative ups and downs and at one point quite late in the process I was on the verge of starting a new project, but I am glad that I saw it through and am ultimately very happy with the outcome.

How long did it take for you to complete this project?
Overall the project took about 10 hours spread over a couple of weeks. For the sanding I was able to use the new Arbortech Contour Sander which saved me an enormous amount of time, and allowed me to achieve a finish which I would have struggled to achieve otherwise. I did spend significantly longer time during the process thinking about the progress and where to from here.

How did you feel about being the winning piece for this year's staff woodworking project?
It was great, it was especially rewarding as I had been very unsure about the piece when I was working on it and it was not until close to finishing it that I could see where it was going, even when finished I was a little unsure about it. So receiving the recognition was great, and it is always nice to receive positive feedback from colleagues and friends.

Where does this piece reside now?
The piece takes pride of place in entry hall, and does sometimes double as a hat stand. I have an old house and the hallway is quite dark so I am currently thinking about adding some lighting to the piece. If I do it would be an up light recessed into the stand.

Final comments?
When I attended high school it was compulsory for boys to do woodworking and metal working. I was never good at either and spent my entire year of woodworking trying to make a table (which my mother loved, as only a mother could). Since I have been working with Arbortech I have been inspired to try a different approach to working with wood and this has allowed me to produce a number of pieces which I have given as presents and also have around my house. This has allowed me to explore and develop a creative side which I previously would not have done. Thanks Arbortech!

Monday, December 1, 2014

Staff Woodworking Competition - My Wooden Bowl By Boro Trpevski



Wooden Bowl
Created by Boro Trpevski, Arbortech Production & Quality Control Engineer 





Novice woodworker? Yes. This was my first woodcarving piece and I have learned some new skills in woodworking with great help from my colleagues. I enjoyed this project very much. Understanding what I can achieve with the Arbortech tools, I will test my artistic skills with my next woodworking project (next time will be something more complex). 

Description of your wood art?
A bowl in the shape of a heart.

Where did you get your inspiration for your wood art piece?
The shape of the wooden off cut piece. It was natural to follow the shape as is with small modifications. The natural shape of this wood piece and it's size dictated what I could carve out of it. I wanted to preserve the outer spiky form in particular and the outline of the off cut already had a triangular/heart looking form which I more or less followed and created the heart looking bowl. 

What type of wood did you use?
Burl.

What Arbortech tool/s did you use to create this piece?
  • TURBOPlane
  • Mini-TURBO
  • Contour Sander
What was your process in the creation of this project?
1. I started with the Arbortech Mini-Grinder and the Woodcarving Blade only to realize the wood was too hard and it would take too long. I decided to switch to the TURBOPlane for a rough cavity shape on a dipper side of the bowl, then continue with the Mini-TURBO to carve the internal shape.
2. Next, I used the Arbortech Mini-Grinder and the mini Industrial Blade to make a more pronounced "heart" shape out of the bowl. For sanding, I used the Arbortech Contour Sander with several grits.
3. The last step was waxing and polishing. 

How long did it take for you to complete this project?
Approximately 1 hour and a half to complete this project. 

Where does this piece reside now?
It is on a dining table in my home, radiating love for all.
 

Arbortech Staff Woodworking Competition - Rustic Entertainment Tray by Barry Fitzpatrick



Rustic Entertainment Tray
WINNER 2014 Arbortech woodworking competition
Created by Barry Fitzpatrick, Arbortech Production Manager 




Novice woodworker? No 

Description of your wood art?
A portable food and drinks tray. 

Where did you get your inspiration for your wood art piece?
This was an original piece that is something practical to use to transport wine, glasses and finger foods from one area to another safely and securely. To my knowledge, I have seen nothing else like it. 

What type of wood did you use?
Marine plywood and timber dowels. 

What Arbortech tool/s did you use to create this piece?
  • TURBOPlane
  • Power Chisel
  • Woodcarver
  • Contour Sander
What was your process in the creation of this project?
1. Draw a card template for the top tier.
2. Cut two identical sheets of marine plywood to desired size.
3. Transfer the shape and hole centres through the template onto the top tier.
4. Transfer the hole centres through to the bottom sheet of plywood.
5. Drill the 6 holes for the wine glass stems, and cut the top tier to a shorter length for access for the food items on each end.
6. Bore the pillar holes 50% of the thickness of the plywood sheet using the transferred spotted through hole centres from the template with brace and bit.
7. Cut slots with tenor saw to meet up with the wine stem holes and drill and cut centre wine bottle hole roughly smooth with drill bit and rasp file to round.
8. Cut pillars to selected height and end handles from the same 20mm dia dowel rod.
9. Clamp top and bottom tiers to a flat surface and using Arbortech TURBOPlane, shape and wave bevels around the edges, while clamped shape recesses to join wine glass stem holes along two sides.
10. While clamped using the TURBOPlane, plane the top surfaces of both tiers to achieve the desired pattern to achieve the rustic look and cut top tier end bevelled semi-circles.
11. With an Arbortech 50mm Woodcarver Blade shape the utensil, wine bottle base and tile receptacles to prevent movement of items when put onto the tray.
12. With a Woodcarver, cut a slot along the handles to the thickness of the bottom tier.
13. With the Arbortech Power Chisel, form 6 x round recesses at the holes that will accept the and locate the wine glasses securely
14. With the Arbortech Contour Sander, sand all surfaces starting with 80# and working up to 600# sanding discs for a smooth glass finish.
15. Glue the pillars into position into the 50% blind holes, hold in position with the aid of inserting an empty wine bottle for centring the top tier in line with the bottom.
16. Glue the slotted handles onto the base tier each end.
17. After adhesion complete any further last sanding to perfect, clean off any excess glue.
18. Oil with a rag using olive oil.

How long did it take for you to complete this project?
It is difficult to give an exact time as I did not start and finish at one time. I estimate it took me about 8 hours. 

How did you feel about being the winning piece for this year's staff woodworking project?
I was obviously delighted in winning with the knowledge that people liked my idea and piece enough to vote for it, but I was also surprised as there was a lot of other deserving pieces in this staff competition. 

Where does this piece reside now?
My piece is currently residing in my meals area waiting for the weather to change for some BBQ's where I intend to put it to some good use.
Since all my family members have seen the tray they all want one! The trouble is I have no time to make them. It has also crossed my mind to set up and make them on a commercial basis. If I make more, it would be with two bottles of wine instead of one to coincide with the number of glasses.