Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Only the Best Will Pass the Test: The Best Selling TURBOPlane Is Back!

In almost every business operation it is not possible to achieve absolute perfection. For example, there will be times when the stock level is not available to meet the market demands due to a combination of internal and external contributing factors such as material sourcing and accessibility, labour shortage, quality controls, freight and the list goes on.
As many of you know, the Arbortech TURBOPlane has been unavailable due to stock issues for a little under 8 weeks. We have had an outpour of customer orders and requests from both the retail stores and direct customers for the TURBOPlane since the tool took a mini vacation from the woodworking range. This is a positive reinforcement that the TURBOPlane is a great product that is highly demanded by woodworkers. We want to share with you as our loyal customers the story behind the reason TURBOPlane has been absent from our website and the store shelves. 

http://www.arbortech.com.au/view/woodworking/turboplane/

From the time the company was established, Arbortech has entrenched a standard for utmost stringent quality controls. This quality control proceeding is a custom which we highlight not only within our production headquarters but also with our suppliers. Of course, when dealing with any external parties you always run a possibility of unforeseen issues.

During the process of manufacturing one of our key suppliers experienced difficulties in producing the TURBOPlane to satisfy our exact specifications. The issue was the perfect positioning of the carbide teeth to our very tight tolerances. The teeth has to be fastened to pristine accuracy to achieve smooth and even planning, enabling the tool to cut down in a vertical plain so all three teeth cut simultaneously. If the teeth are uneven, even by a small degree then only one or two teeth will cut, therefore not providing the smooth quality cut that makes the TURBOPlane so special.
Our stringent Quality Control Procedures were making sure that only “perfect” blades passed our controls but the reject rate became unacceptable and we were not able to supply the demand.

The only way forward was to adjust the manufacturing method to help our supplier to achieve our specifications. This process unfortunately took some time and we had to put a hold on TURBOPlane production during that period. A detailed engineering review, the design, manufacturing of new tooling, prototype production and intensive testing of several sample lots were required before we achieved our goals.

http://www.arbortech.com.au/view/woodworking/turboplane/

We apologise for any delivery delays caused by this but we know that such attention to detail makes the difference between a “good” and a “great” product.  We view this as direct investment in the TURBOPlane to ensure our customers get nothing but the very best from our products.
The good news? Our supplier has confidently settled into their new manufacturing techniques which means production of the TURBOPlanes is fluid and efficient and the product is now back in stock to be released to customers who have patiently been waiting for the tool.
We shared this story with you to give you a glimpse into the processes that each and every Arbortech woodworking tool goes through to ensure once it reaches our customers, the tool delivers as per the Arbortech quality philosophy. Some people have told us our tools are not cheap. At the same time, we have been told by customers the quality and durability of Arbortech tools are unsurpassed by any other tool out there on the market. We ostentatiously stand behind each and every Arbortech tool we sell and look forward to having the TURBOPlane (amongst other Arbortech woodworking tools) in the toolboxes of woodworkers everywhere!

Click here to buy now.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Flint Edward Sculpting - Nannup Totem Poles

A bit of a flashback to Flint's earlier work.





Location: Nannup

Inspiration for sculpture: 
There are eight Totem Poles in total and each is 7 meters high which was completed in 2008.
The local council purposely cut down the Jarrah trees and Flint was asked to do work his magic on the trees.

Tools Used: Arbortech Mini-Grinder, TURBOPlane, sanding discs

Process: 
With most of Flint's work, the process is very similar from one project to another. The amount of work depends on the complexity of the tree and end carving.
  1. Debarking
  2. Chainsaw work - This step took a whole to talk the bulk of the wood out and working out the proportions. The time for this process really depends on what project it is so therefore, timing varies. The main chainsaw work here is to take the main bulk of the timber away.
  3. Proportions - When Flint carves out the proportions he is careful to not add too much definition so he has room to move with proportions if needed. Once he is happy with the proportions he works on the definition and hard cuts. Once it is down to this stage he will then look at the finer details and works from here.
Completion time: One week for each Totem Pole. Flint did about another dozen Totem Poles and there will be more coming Totem Poles which Flint will be working on for the remainder of 2013.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Flint Edward Sculpting - Gecko

Here is one of Flint's current sculpting commissioned work.


Location: Rose Gum, Honey Wood Estate, WA

Inspiration for sculpture: 
The client requested for a piece to sit in the children's playground that was of a native Australian animal. With the tree stump that was to be used from, Flint decided to carve a Gecko. The Gecko is bolted into the concrete so the children can freely play on it.

Tools Used: Arbortech Mini-Grinder, TURBOPlane, sanding discs

Process: 
The wood used for the Gecko was a lot harder wood which slows down the process a bit however, Flint is always armed with his Arbortech tools and he says "this wood is harder to work with and makes the debarking process longer than normal but with Arbortech tools there is no drama!"
  1. Debarking
  2. Chainsaw work - This step took a whole to talk the bulk of the wood out and working out the proportions. The time for this process really depends on what project it is so therefore, timing varies. The main chainsaw work here is to take the main bulk of the timber away.
  3. Proportions - When Flint carves out the proportions he is careful to not add too much definition so he has room to move with proportions if needed. Once he is happy with the proportions he works on the definition and hard cuts. Once it is down to this stage he will then look at the finer details and works from here.
Completion time: Three and a half weeks (due to the hardness of the wood).

Watch this space for more Flint projects!

Monday, September 16, 2013

Flint Edward Sculpting - Dolphins

More of Flint Edward's work below.

Dolphins

Location: Perth Motor Lodge Flag, WA

Inspiration for sculpture: 
The shape of the timber inspired Flint to create dolphins. Still with the animals theme, Flint decided to carve the dolphins as they are the animals of the world and everyone loves dolphins!

Tools Used: Arbortech Mini-Grinder, Power Chisel and sanding discs.

Process: 
For the dolphin carvings, it was the same process as that of the wedgetail eagle. 
  1. Debarking
  2. Chainsaw work - This step took a whole to talk the bulk of the wood out and working out the proportions. The time for this process really depends on what project it is so therefore, timing varies. The main chainsaw work here is to take the main bulk of the timber away.
  3. Proportions - When Flint carves out the proportions he is careful to not add too much definition so he has room to move with proportions if needed. Once he is happy with the proportions he works on the definition and hard cuts. Once it is down to this stage he will then look at the finer details and works from here.
Completion time: One and a half weeks.

Stay tuned for more work from Flint!

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Woodworking Sculptor & Iceman - Flint Edward

We have featured Flint Edward in our earlier blog post (click here if you haven't read the post or seen the amazing pictures yet) and he is known for his work with wood and ice, which is nothing short of amazing. 

Check out more of Flint's recent work below.

Wedgetail Eagle With Fish
Location: Perth Motor Lodge Flag, WA

For this sculpture Flint wanted to stay with the Australian animals theme. This tree had three limbs coming off it and Flint had to come up with a concept that would utilize the timber. Flint also wanted to carve an animal that had "life" to it and from the structure of the tree it would be perfect to carve an eagle swooping down to attack it's prey. The challenge in this sculpture was getting the proportions right and structurally conveying the carving.

Inspiration for sculpture: 
Flint lives in the country, Green Hills which is 23km from York and there is a hill nearby that has a family of wedgetail eagles which he sees every day.
Tools Used: Arbortech Mini-Grinder, Power Chisel and sanding discs.

Process: 
  1. Debarking
  2. Chainsaw work - This step took a whole to talk the bulk of the wood out and working out the proportions. The time for this process really depends on what project it is so therefore, timing varies. The main chainsaw work here is to take the main bulk of the timber away.
  3. Proportions - When Flint carves out the proportions he is careful to not add too much definition so he has room to move with proportions if needed. Once he is happy with the proportions he works on the definition and hard cuts. Once it is down to this stage he will then look at the finer details and works from here.
Completion time: Three and a half weeks

Stay tuned for more work from Flint!

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Woodworking Tip: Reuse Wood Chips To Make Wood Animals

More animals made from wood chips.



Has our series of wood chips carving posts inspired you? Have you created your own version of wood chip carving sculptures? If so, we'd love for you to share with us! Please send your version to us via email by clicking here.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Woodworking Tip: Reuse Wood Chips To Make An Eagle

The man's work of wood chips sculptures continue...

Be inspired below...



Simply amazing. 

We welcome your comments below.